Project Spotlight – Tacoma Furnished Monthly Rental

Project Spotlight – Tacoma Furnished Monthly Rental

Back in the fall of 2019, we visited an in progress project in Tacoma, Washington that was initially intended as off-campus housing for Pacific Lutheran University students. The project involved an extensive expansion and full renovation of an existing single-family home. The first floor’s larger, shared amenity spaces were covered by a mini-split, ductless heat pump. However, because the airflow properties of the floorplan causing ‘cold spots,’ and the fact that each private room needs its own thermostatic controls, the developers chose to use Ducoterra’s Solaray II ceiling heat panels – provided by Mighty Energy Solutions – for the majority of the space, including the entire second floor.

However, since the project completed in early 2021 (during the pandemic,) it was decided to make the project available on Furnished Finder – an online service used mostly by traveling nurses who need temporary accommodations when they are in town.

Park Ave. Tacoma, WA Bedroom w/ceiling heat panel

Independent Control

Since some units go unoccupied from time to time, and each person staying here are on temporary assignment with no lasting connection with their fellow occupants, the feature of the infrared heating panels (up near the ceiling light in the photo) that allows each room to be independently heated was perfect for this application. Rooms not in use can be kept at a minimal temperature, saving energy and money. Meanwhile, each occupant is able to control the temperature to their own comfort levels with no effect on the preferences of other occupants.

As you can see, the panels are unobtrusive and completely out of the way. The infrared radiance they produce that warms the room and its occupants is entirely invisible, and total absence of moving parts means that they are completely silent and do not stir up the air and any particulates in the room. This healthy, practically invisible approach is appreciated by health professionals. And no one needs to hear a loud bang when the heat comes on  – especially people who may be experiencing jet lag.

Complete Cozy Comfort

While the mini-split ductless heat pump in the great room does an efficient job of heating that space, the developers chose to augment this solution with additional panels for increased comfort and even distribution of heat in the shared amenity spaces.Park Ave. Tacoma, WA great room and kitchen using mini-split, dutless heat pump and infrared radiant ceiling heat panel

This efficient hybrid approach that takes advantage of the two types heat creates more flexibility of control and is a common means of providing additional heat the less than perfect coverage of the mini-split system, which has the added benefit of providing air conditioning in the increasingly hot summers in the area.

And, in terms of property management, the life-time warranty and 100% maintenance-free aspect nature of the infrared radiant heating panels was very attractive for the owners. And they won’t have to replace the panels for decades.

Park Ave HallwayPark Ave - kitchenette

Project Amenities

  • Nine private, fully furnished bedrooms
  • Secure remote access to the main entry and your personal room
  • Bathroom shared with only 1 other room, which may be empty at any given time
  • Weekly housekeeping to keep everything spotless
  • All utilities including WIFI and cable included
  • All basic toiletries provided and restocked weekly
  • Outdoor patio with BBQ and entertainment space to enjoy with new friends
  • Kitchen fully stocked with all appliances and items you may need
  • Kitchenette outside bedroom for quick and convenient access
  • Security System and cameras in common areas for additional sense of security
  • New laundry facilities
  • Air conditioning in common areas
  • Reserved parking space
  • Less than a mile to the freeway
  • Less than 15 minutes to all local hospitals and medical centers
  • 5-10 minutes from 3 major shopping centers

Geo Answers: Sustainability – Part 8: A Cradle-to-Cradle Approach

Nothing lasts forever. Even with the up to 40 year life-expectancy of infrared radiant heating devices, like nearly everything, eventually they will wear out. And it might not be the heaters that fail. It might well be that the building itself needs to be demolished, or a major renovation results in a great deal of interior demo. Salvaging still useful parts of a building is a great new trend. This aspect of demolition may be more precisely called “disassembly,” where anything reusable or recyclable is kept intact and used elsewhere, or transformed into new things, rather than just packed into a landfill. This is referred to as  ‘cradle-to-cradle’ approach. And Ducoterra infrared radiant heating panels have been way ahead of the cradle-to-cradle curve.

Ducoterra infrared heating panels are easily dismounted from the ceiling by removing a maximum  of eight bolts or screws (depending on panel size,) and three wires. Once removed, the panel can be easily broken down into four readily recycled components: the aluminum ‘box,’ the steel back, and the sheet of aerogel insulation and wire element inside. So, either decades after, or when the building or some part of it is being demolished, it will take very little time, effort, and energy to return a panel’s materials back into usable components for new, useful items going forward.

What this means, in terms of sustainability, is that a cradle-to-cradle product remains sustainable even after it is no longer useful in its current form. This mimics what nature itself does. Rather than producing waste as an ultimate end product, it produces resources in a closed loop cycle where there is never any actual waste. A dead leaf, for example, becomes food for small organisms, which, in turn, become food for larger organisms and the cycle continues.    

see also: Part 1: Definition of Terms Part 2: Environmental Impacts | Part 3: Embodied Carbon | Part 4: Installation Impact
Part 5: Operational EmissionsPart 6: Installation Impact | Part 7: Resilience

Geo Answers: Sustainability – Part 7: Resilience

Resilience is a special subset of durability and reliability. Something may be built to last and work as intended for a long time, like a solid old car. However, it may not adapt well to contemporary uses, or lack modern safety equipment and amenities, or otherwise become obsolete in a new and changing context. The car may run great, but it runs on gasoline and was, possibly, even intended to run on leaded fuel. And, for example, it will never be autonomous.

Systems in your home that run on electricity are resilient in that, no matter how the electricity is generated, or how much that method of generation changes, electric systems and appliances will continue to work without skipping a beat.

Electric infrared radiant heat requires few to no moving parts to fail or wear out. And the parts that can eventually fail (usually after decades of regular use) will, very likely, continue to be readily available or effectively substituted for the foreseeable future. These appliances can easily be salvaged from a building that has outlived its usefulness and be reinstalled in another setting. Since they are usually mounted well above the floor, they are far more likely to survive all but the worst floods. They don’t have any pressurized refrigerants, so there is no chance of toxic leakage that will also render them useless until repaired and recharged. And they can be easily adapted to ‘smart device / smart home’ control systems, no matter how that technology evolves.

Building things to last and be readily repaired is great. Building things that can also survive and adapt through rapidly changing technological landscapes, large-scale infrastructural changes, and even increasing environmental threats is even better. 

see also: Part 1: Definition of Terms Part 2: Environmental Impacts | Part 3: Embodied Carbon | Part 4: Installation Impact
Part 5: Operational EmissionsPart 6: Installation Impact

Geo Answers: “How is Infrared Radiant Heat Different?”

Geo Answers: “How is Infrared Radiant Heat Different?”

We have all experienced infrared radiant heat when basking in sunshine. We just don’t associate this feeling with how we heat our buildings, since, in most cases when it’s cold out, we stay warm indoors by heating the air around us. The air around us is what our thermostats measure, too.

The sun shines a full spectrum of colors and we can see most of them. But at either end of that spectrum are invisible light rays: ultraviolet and infrared. Although ultraviolet light does many things, some vital to life, it can cause sunburn, skin discoloration, skin cancer, and some loss of eyesight. Infrared rays on the other hand, do not have those negative drawbacks. All of our heaters shine only infrared light at end of the spectrum that warms people, pets, furniture, and the surfaces in the room it shines on – just like the sun heats the land and the water. The air barely blocks this direct radiance, so it doesn’t heat up this way. Instead, the warmed surfaces that do block the light, like the floor, walls, and other surfaces, shed their warmth into the air and the warm air rises into the room. Also, since surfaces are warmed, it takes the edge off bare feet on a cold floor, and a warm couch is cozy. So, unlike other forms of interior heat, infrared provides heat we can feel three ways.

A kitchen with infrared radiant heat.

This is a big part of why infrared radiant heat is so efficient. Most types of installed furnaces and heaters use a noisy fan, (with moving parts that can fail,) to blow air across a hot element and into the living spaces. This means the very first stage of energy use is taken up just heating and blowing air around. This has the added effect of stirring up dust, allergens, and other particulates. And, as soon as this warmed, turbulent air enters the room (since it is lighter than the cooler air around it) it begins to rise toward the ceiling. This means the air in the room must be heated up enough to keep some of the warmth down where it is wanted. And, since all the air in the building is connected, the heat diffuses to every space even as it leaks out of the smallest cracks in the outside walls where the drafts get in.

While you feel it as warmth instead of seeing it, infrared radiance is, in fact, light. It may be useful to think of our heaters as light fixtures. You turn them on, and they shine. You can feel the warmth within minutes. There is no boom of expanding vents or white noise of rushing, dusty air – just warm radiance. The air temperature comes up and the thermostat registers it, but you will be warm even before that happens. And, just like you don’t need to turn on all the lights in the house to get the light you need, all the infrared radiant heaters in your home don’t have to be turned on just so you can get warm in the room you are actually in.

Warm family

Just as you will be warmer in the sunlight on a clear, chilly day than in the shade, even though the air temperature is the same. With infrared heat, the thermostat on the wall might read slightly lower than you used to think was comfortable, yet you will feel toasty and warm. In the sunlight on a clear, chilly day you will be warmer than you would be in the shade, even though the air temperature is the same. It is similar with infrared heat; the thermostat on the wall might read slightly lower than you used to think was comfortable, yet you will feel toasty, cozy, silent, direct heat where and when you need it – like a light coming on. You may find yourself giving your extra blankets to Goodwill, and spending less money staying cozy in your home. Mighty Energy Solutions carries several different models of infrared radiant heaters. Whether you need to heat your front porch, veranda, bedroom, bathroom or kitchen, please give Geo a call at 610.585.8851 to discuss which of our products keep you toasty.

Mighty Energy to Host a Site on the 2015 NW Green Home Tour

Mighty Energy to Host a Site on the 2015 NW Green Home Tour

Mighty Energy is proud to announce that we are co-hosting a site on the NW Green Home Tour! The Westside Remodel + Heat Conversion (April 25, 11-5, 3443 49th Ave SW, Seattle) is a simple and sweet, 2-story, energy efficient addition designed by Young Architecture to give this family a little breathing room. Mighty Energy supplied SolaRay infrared radiant ceiling panels to partner with a new ductless heat pump for a total heat conversion from their forced air furnace system.

Even with adding square footage, this family hadn’t seen an increase in their electrical bills thanks in large part to their new heat system as well as smart, efficient building techniques. Stop by the site any time between 11-5 to experience the difference radiant heat can make in a Pacific Northwest home.

Learn more about this and other sites on the NW Green Home Tour.